I just read an article that has identified new ways to describe the power of early childhood to others, Life Outcomes, Not Test Scores. These positive benefits that last a lifetime are so much more important than test scores for determining the benefits of programs for young children. We have known for years that test scores of young children are not good predictors of the benefits of quality programs for young children. Now the media and the public are beginning to recognize that the effects are far reaching.

Today, in the New York Times, a new important study was released on the importance of PreK and long-term effects. This research study done in Boston was conducted by University of Chicago, MIT, and University of California, Berkeley. The design of the study allowed the researchers to compare 4,571 young children who attended a quality PreK in Boston and a control group of 4215 young children who did not attend.

The findings are very important for early childhood educators and supporters of young children. In this very carefully conducted study, compared with a control group, the effects can be clearly understood.

Children who attend PreK in Boston, when compared to those who did not attend, were found to be:

  • Less likely to be suspended
  • Less likely to be incarcerated as juveniles
  • More likely to graduate from high school (70%)
  • More likely to enroll in college
  • More likely to graduate from college

A Berkley economics researcher concluded that “large scale public preschool programs can improve education attainment for those who attend.”  It was further explained that the benefits were more encompassing than simple test scores. These long-term achievements were considered positive life outcomes which positively affect the educational level of society.

Share the news, sound the horn, and celebrate the findings from this important study.

We are concerned about “life outcomes, not test scores.” 

We are involved in important work, and your effort is valuable!

 

 


Leonhardt, D. (2021, May 10). Life outcomes, not test scores. The New York Timeshttps://messaging-custom-newsletters.nytimes.com/template/oakv2?uri=nyt://newsletter/f71bc80c-51b0-5a66-9de7-3a6826e9bb7d&productCode=NN&abVariantId=1&te=1&nl=the-morning&emc=edit_nn_20210510

Gray-Love, G., Pathak, P., & Walters, C. (2021, May) The Long-Term Effects of Universal Preschool in Boston SEII Discussion Paper.